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20 Foods You Didn't Know Were Named After People

20 Foods You Didn't Know Were Named After People


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Whenever a new food item is invented or discovered, be it a completely new dish or a new variety of fruit or vegetable, it needs to be named. Some people, if they’re feeling scientific, go with a variation of a Latin origin. More literal-minded folks just name it whatever’s closest to what the product is (see “meatloaf”). Others choose a name that honors a specific person, be it a nobleman or monarch, the inventor, or someone else entirely. We bet that a lot more foods fall into the last category than you might think, and we’ve rounded up 20 of them.

20 Foods You Didn't Know Were Named After People (Slideshow)

Some foods that were named after people are pretty darn obvious. For example, there’s no mystery about who Cherry Garcia’s name was inspired by. But for other foods it might not even cross our minds that there’s someone who inspired its name. Take beef Stroganoff, for example, the Russian dish of beef in a sour cream sauce. It was named after a real guy named Count Stroganov. Heck, even the Kentucky Hot Brown, an open-faced sandwich, was named after J. Graham Brown, the owner of the hotel where it was invented. And when an Oregon-based horticulturist named Seth Luelling developed a new breed of cherry in 1875, he decided to name it after his Chinese assistant, Bing.

It’s amazing how many dishes named after people have come and gone, generally never to be heard from again. Ever hear of an English sweet popular in the early 1800s called Bonaparte’s ribs? How about peach pudding a la Cleveland, invented by Delmonico’s chef Charles Ranhofer in honor of Grover Cleveland? And the next time you’re in a diner order scrambled eggs a la Columbus, a heart-stopping assemblage of eggs, ham, fried blood pudding, and beef brains named in honor of Christopher Columbus, and see how many stares you get.

While plenty of foods were named after real people, so too were drinks. Veuve-Clicquot, a popular brand of Champagne, was named for Barbe-Nicole Ponsardin, the widow ('veuve' in French) of François Clicquot. The Ramos gin fizz, a gin-based cocktail, was named after its inventor, New Orleans bartender Henry C. Ramos. While the origins of the margarita’s name has been disputed, it’s most likely named after actress Rita Hayworth, who got her start dancing in Tijuana nightclubs under her real name, Margarita Cansino. Coincidentally, the Shirley Temple, a combination of Sprite and grenadine, was also named after Hayworth.

So read on to learn about 20 people whose names live on through foods, even though most people may not realize it.

Fettucine Alfredo

Alfredo’s of Rome was (and still is) an incredibly popular restaurant in Rome. In the early 20th century chef Alfredo de Lelio invented a dish for his pregnant wife, which was basically just fettucine with a whole lot of butter and Parmesan cheese added. Funny enough, the dish that bears his name today bears little resemblance to what de Lelio invented.

Eggs Benedict

So who exactly was Benedict, anyway? There are two theories: One, a stockbroker named Lemuel Benedict claimed to have thought up the dish while nursing a hangover at New York’s Waldorf-Astoria in 1894. Two, Delmonico’s head chef Charles Ranhofer claimed that he invented it for the stockbroker LeGrand Benedict. Either way, Benedict had an awesome first name.

Click here for the origins of 18 more famous foods named after real people.

Dan Myers is the Eat/Dine Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow him on Twitter @sirmyers.


20 Foods You Didn't Know Were Named After Places

This onion relative (also known as the “green onion”) was probably first cultivated in Central Asia or Iran. The ancient Greeks, however, thought it came from closer to home and called it askolonion, after the ancient seaport of Ashkelon, now a city on the southern coast of Israel, from which it was shipped. The scallion’s relative, the shallot, takes its name from the same place.

17. Sriracha

It’s thanks to the Los Angeles-based company Huy Fong Foods that sriracha (which Huy Fong makes with red jalapeños) has become the “it” sauce of our times. Sriracha is used not only as a condiment but also as a flavoring for tortilla and potato chips, almonds, tomato juice, mayonnaise, jerky, sea salt, and even seaweed snacks. Huy Fong doesn’t own the name, though, and didn’t invent it. It’s a variation on Si Racha, a coastal city in eastern Thailand, where a similar sauce was originally made as a condiment for local seafood.

18. Tangerine

The tangerine is one of several closely related citrus fruits bred from the mandarin orange. Tangerines were probably originally grown in China but later thrived around the southern Mediterranean. They got their modern name after an early 19th century Florida citrus farmer imported them from the Moroccan port of Tangier.

19. Vichyssoise

Vichyssoise means “from Vichy,” a spa town in central France. It is a variation on the traditional French leek and potato soup, but usually thinner than the original and served cold. The idea came from a French-born chef, Louis Diat, who cooked at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in New York City about a century ago. Vichyssoise is seldom seen in France, and the name confuses the French because in common culinary usage, Vichy is associated with carrots, which grow particularly well in the area.

20. Wiener Schnitzel

The name of this preparation of thin, pounded veal slices, coated with flour, beaten eggs, and breadcrumbs and fried in butter, simply means “Vienna cutlet.” It is considered one of the defining dishes of Austrian cuisine. The American hot dog chain called Wienerschnitzel does not serve it: its name plays on wiener, an alternate name for hot dogs (see Frankfurter, above).


20 Foods You Didn't Know Were Named After Places

Small, round, and seeded, the Key lime came from Southeast Asia by way of Spain, ending up in — among many other places — the Florida Keys. It is also known as Mexican or West Indian lime, but “Key” remains the most popular name, probably largely thanks to that seductive dessert — Key lime pie. The everyday grocery store lime, called the Persian lime, is a cross between Key lime and lemon.

12. Lima Bean

Okay, the bean’s name is pronounced “lye-ma,” and the capital of Peru is “lee-ma,” but this pale green, often-scorned legume is indeed named for the Peruvian city. The bean is native to several parts of Central and South America, but was widely cultivated around Lima. The Spanish Viceroyalty, which administered the area in colonial times, shipped limas around the Americas and to Europe in crates labeled “Lima, Peru” — so people started calling them “Lima beans.”

13. Mayonnaise

Though some scholars offer other theories, it is widely believed that this essential condiment was invented in, and is named for, Mahón, the capital of the Spanish island of Menorca. The Spanish called it salsa mahonesa, and the French took it home with them after they wrested the island from British control in 1756 and adjusted the spelling into something French.

Researchers think that peaches came from China originally, where there is evidence they were cultivated as far back as 8,000 years ago. Europeans frequently misidentified the origins of new foods, however, and for whatever reasons became convinced that peaches came from Persia. Thus, the Romans called the peach the malum persicum, or Persian apple, and the French contorted persicum into pêche — which in turn became peach.

Sardines are tiny fish of the herring family, usually sold cooked, dressed with olive oil or some kind of sauce, and crammed into elongated cans as tightly — as riders in a rush-hour subway car. Larger sardines, which are simply grilled, sometimes show up on Spanish or Portuguese restaurant menus. There are several kinds of sardine, and the fish are found in seas and oceans around the world. Historically, though, they were particularly numerous off the Italian island of Sardinia, for which they are named.


Cobb salad is yet another "kitchen sink scramble" dish. It was invented by Bob Cobb, proprietor of the famously star-studded Hollywood Brown Derby restaurant in 1937.

After a long shift, Cobb had not yet eaten dinner and was rummaging through the restaurant fridge's leftovers, throwing what he found together with the line cook's recently discarded bacon ends to create a salad. He chopped it up and dressed it with French dressing. The next day, a wealthy regular customer requested the "Cobb salad," and the rest is history.


20 Foods You Didn't Know Were Named After Places

It’s often described as a cousin of the bagel, but this flat, chewy roll is a very different thing: Its dough isn’t boiled before baking like the bagel’s it has a slight depression in its middle instead of a hole and that depression is typically filled with minced onions. Like the bagel, though, it is a centuries-old Jewish bakery staple — in this case invented in, and named for, the city of Białystok, Poland.

This opulent, creamy soup, usually based on some variety of crustacean — lobster bisque is a classic of old-school French cuisine — is believed to take its name from the Bay of Biscay, the broad gulf between the western coast of France and the northern coast of Spain.

3. Cantaloupe

Sweet, juicy, and luminously orange-fleshed, this delicious melon arrived in Italy around the 15th century, probably from Persia by way of Armenia. It was first planted in the Papal Gardens in the commune of Cantalupo, near Rome, giving it its name. (Bonus fact: True cantaloupe has a smooth exterior. The melon we usually eat under that name, with a net-like pattern indented on its skin, is actually a related fruit properly known as muskmelon.)

The bright red, moderately spicy cayenne pepper is most commonly seen in its dried and powdered form. Cayenne might take its name from an indigenous Brazilian word for “pepper,” but many researchers believe it was named for the trade in these chiles along the Cayenne River in French Guiana, a tiny nation that abuts Brazil on the northeastern coast of South America.

5. Fig Newton

This love-it-or-hate-it confection was invented by Philadelphia baker Charles Roser in the late 19th century, originally as an aid to digestion. He promptly sold the recipe to the Kennedy Biscuit Company of Cambridgeport, Massachusetts, which named it after the neighboring community of Newton (“Fig Newton” being catchier than “Fig Cambridgeport”).


20 Foods You Didn't Know Were Named After Places

Small, round, and seeded, the Key lime came from Southeast Asia by way of Spain, ending up in — among many other places — the Florida Keys. It is also known as Mexican or West Indian lime, but “Key” remains the most popular name, probably largely thanks to that seductive dessert — Key lime pie. The everyday grocery store lime, called the Persian lime, is a cross between Key lime and lemon.

12. Lima Bean

Okay, the bean’s name is pronounced “lye-ma,” and the capital of Peru is “lee-ma,” but this pale green, often-scorned legume is indeed named for the Peruvian city. The bean is native to several parts of Central and South America, but was widely cultivated around Lima. The Spanish Viceroyalty, which administered the area in colonial times, shipped limas around the Americas and to Europe in crates labeled “Lima, Peru” — so people started calling them “Lima beans.”

13. Mayonnaise

Though some scholars offer other theories, it is widely believed that this essential condiment was invented in, and is named for, Mahón, the capital of the Spanish island of Menorca. The Spanish called it salsa mahonesa, and the French took it home with them after they wrested the island from British control in 1756 and adjusted the spelling into something French.

Researchers think that peaches came from China originally, where there is evidence they were cultivated as far back as 8,000 years ago. Europeans frequently misidentified the origins of new foods, however, and for whatever reasons became convinced that peaches came from Persia. Thus, the Romans called the peach the malum persicum, or Persian apple, and the French contorted persicum into pêche — which in turn became peach.

Sardines are tiny fish of the herring family, usually sold cooked, dressed with olive oil or some kind of sauce, and crammed into elongated cans as tightly — as riders in a rush-hour subway car. Larger sardines, which are simply grilled, sometimes show up on Spanish or Portuguese restaurant menus. There are several kinds of sardine, and the fish are found in seas and oceans around the world. Historically, though, they were particularly numerous off the Italian island of Sardinia, for which they are named.


33 Grocery Store Staples Named After Real People

Betty Crocker, Dr Pepper, and Aunt Jemima may be figments of a marketing team’s imagination, but a lot of the names on foods were actual people. From Duncan Hines to Chef Boyardee , here are 33 grocery store items named after real people.

1. DUNCAN HINES CAKE MIXES

Before Tim and Nina Zagat, there was Duncan Hines, a traveling salesman who made a habit of writing about the food that he ate on his travels, which he eventually turned into a best-selling book, Adventures in Good Eating. The book—and man—became so popular that restaurants and hotels given positive reviews by Hines began hanging signs in their establishments denoting that they were “Recommended by Duncan Hines.” By 1940, Hines’ name was so synonymous with good eats that he was approached about licensing it for a line of high-quality food products, which at that time consisted of more than 250 canned, bottled, and boxed products. Today, the Duncan Hines line is not so diverse, but it’s still pretty massive, with more than 80 boxed mixes for cakes, muffins, brownies, and beyond.

2. BIRDS EYE FROZEN VEGGIES

Would-be biologist Clarence Birdseye revolutionized the food industry when he invented a new method for flash-freezing food—the same process that’s used to freeze the Birds Eye line of fruits and veggies. More interested in being an inventor and entrepreneur than a food-maker, in 1929 Birdseye sold his company and patents for the tidy sum of $22 million.

3. CAMPBELL’S SOUP

Joseph A. Campbell is the man behind the canned soup company that spawned a home cooking revolution and a pop art phenomenon. Originally part of a beefsteak tomato canning and preserving company, in 1891 Campbell bought out his original partner and began working with chemist-turned-chairman John T. Dorrance on a condensed soup recipe. In 1894, Campbell retired, but the company retained his name in 1897, the company released its first product line—including tomato, chicken, vegetable and oxtail soups, and consommé—and a year later unveiled its now-iconic red and white packaging.

4. LAY’S POTATO CHIPS

In 1931, Herman Lay was a traveling potato chip salesman working out of his car in the southern part of the United States. By the end of the decade, he was running the show, at least from a distribution standpoint. In 1939—after buying two plants from the Barrett Company—Lay moved to Atlanta to set up shop on his own as the H.W. Lay Company. In the decades that followed, Lay’s became the country’s most successful snack food company, and eventually merged with Frito (in 1961) then Pepsi (in 1965).

5. CHEF BOYARDEE BEEFARONI

The only thing fictional about Chef Boyardee is the spelling of his last name Ettore “Hector” Boiardi is the real name of this master of canned pasta, who began working professionally at the age of 11 and was leading the kitchen of the Plaza Hotel by the time he was 17. (The spelling change was, understandably, for pronunciation purposes.)

6. DOLE PINEAPPLES

From fresh fruits to frozen ones and fresh-cut vegetables to packaged foods, Dole Food Company products can be found from one end of the grocery store to the other. And it all began back in 1899, when James Dole came to Hawaii with $1000 to his name, a Harvard degree on his resume, and a desire to grow the world’s best pineapples, in order to give the rest of the country a taste.

7. ENTENMANN'S PASTRIES

Today, you can usually find Entenmann’s donuts, cookies, cakes, and pies at the end of the bread aisle. But back in 1898, you would have had to travel to Brooklyn to get your Entenmann’s fix, for it’s here that German immigrant William Entenmann started up his own bakery business, with products which he delivered door-to-door by horse-drawn carriage.

8. CELESTE PIZZA

Italian immigrant Celeste Lizio is a culinary legend in the Chicago area, where she opened her first pizzeria in the 1930s. By the next decade, demand for her pies had outgrown the supply, so Lizio opted to close the restaurant and focus solely on supplying her product and ingredients to a host of nearby pizzerias. Shortly thereafter, the Quaker Oats Company came calling to begin freezing “Mama” Celeste’s pizzas (yep, that’s her picture on the box) and supply them to a nation full of hungry pie lovers.

9. HEINZ KETCHUP

Anyone who follows politics—or the life of John Kerry and his wife, Teresa Heinz Kerry, in particular—knows that there is indeed a real family behind the Heinz brand. And it started with Pittsburgh native Henry J. Heinz at the helm, who began his food career in the 1860s delivering horseradish, pickles, sauerkraut, and vinegar by horse-drawn carriage. In 1876, ketchup and relish were added to the Heinz culinary repertoire. In 1896, Heinz added the “57 Varieties” to the company packaging, indicating the 57 products the company produced. In truth, there were more than 60, but Heinz thought 57 sounded more interesting. Today, the brand manufactures more than 5700 products.

10. KELLOGG’S CORN FLAKES

One of the world’s most iconic breakfast cereals is the result of a mistake made by W.K. Kellogg and his brother, Dr. John Harvey Kellogg, when their failed attempt at making granola resulted in a bowl of flaked wheat berry. Which tasted pretty darn good. So they tried to fail again, this time with corn, and Kellogg’s Corn Flakes were born. They were introduced in 1906 by the Battle Creek Toasted Corn Flake Company, which was renamed the Kellogg Company in 1922.

11. BEN & JERRY’S ICE CREAM

By now it’s no secret that the titular ice cream makers responsible for such legendary flavors as Cherry Garcia and Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough are Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield, two childhood friends who opened their first ice cream shop in Burlington, Vermont in 1978 and have since transformed the brand into a frozen global behemoth.

12. FAMOUS AMOS COOKIES

Not only is Wally Amos, the man behind Famous Amos Cookies, a real person, he’s alive and well—having recently celebrated his 78th birthday—and splits his time between Hawaii and New York (he even appeared as himself in a 2012 episode of The Office). And though he was still a teen when he began tinkering with the chocolate chip cookie recipe that made him famous (it was a twist on his aunt’s cookie concoction), it wasn’t until later in life that he pursued baking as a vocation. After a stint with the Air Force, Amos went to college and took a clerical job at the William Morris Agency, which eventually led to him becoming the company’s first African American talent agent, where he headed up the rock ‘n’ roll department. (Discovering Simon & Garfunkel didn’t hurt his career.) In 1940, with the support of some of his celebrity friends—and a $25,000 loan from Marvin Gaye and Helen Reddy—Amos quit the show business game and opened his first cookie store in Los Angeles.

13. GRANNY SMITH APPLES

Apple pie’s favorite filler was discovered in Australia in 1868, when Maria Ann “Granny” Smith found the seedling in her garden in the same spot where she had thrown out some French crab apples from Tasmania, which is what she originally believed them to be. It wasn’t until almost a century later, during the 1960s, that American apple growers began harvesting the variety, which today is one of the most popular types of apple.

14. DANNON YOGURT

Dannon (a.k.a. Danon or Danone) is the nickname of Daniel Carasso, the son of yogurt producer Isaac Carasso, who founded the Dannon company (as Danone) in Spain in 1919. A decade later, the company relocated to France and then, following the German occupation of France during World War II, to New York, where the company name lost an “e” and gained an “n” for easier pronunciation among Americans. As for Daniel: He eventually became an important force in the brand’s global marketing, and the man many hold responsible for popularizing yogurt around the world.

15. JIMMY DEAN SAUSAGES

Long before he became a sausage king in 1969, Jimmy Dean’s name was a familiar one, thanks to a thriving country music career (his biggest hit came in 1961, with “Big Bad John”) and a television gig on The Jimmy Dean Show (which kicked off Jim Henson’s career). But Dean believed he needed a fallback career, so he and his brother Dean began a butchering company in Plainview, Texas. Within six months, the Jimmy Dean Meat Company had turned a profit. In 1984, Dean sold the multimillion dollar company to Sara Lee Foods, and stayed on as its spokesperson through 2003.

16. LITTLE DEBBIE

You know Little Debbie’s face from the last time you tore into a box of Swiss Cake Rolls. But did you know that Little Debbie—the same gingham-dress and wide-brim-hat-wearing youngster on the box—is the granddaughter of McKee Foods founder O.D. McKee? While trying to come up with a name for a new line of family-size cartons of snack cakes, someone suggested that McKee name them after a family member. He chose his granddaughter Debbie, who was four years old at the time.

17. HORMEL CHILI

In 1891, George A. Hormel opened a pork processing plant in Austin, Minnesota, which—thanks to tremendous sales—spawned a retail shop in Minneapolis just two years later. In the 1920s, Hormel developed the world’s first canned ham, which led to a variety of other canned products, including chili and, in 1937, SPAM!

18. KEEBLER COOKIES

Believe that a team of elves are the real source behind Keebler’s line of cookies all you want. The truth is that it’s a man named Godfrey Keebler, who started it all when he opened up a tiny bakery in Philadelphia in 1853. In 1926, Keebler became a founding member of the United Biscuit Company of America, which consisted of a collection of bakeries that distributed their goods to out-of-area customers via automobile. By 1966, this collection of bakeries had grown so large that consolidation became the best option and the company name was changed to the Keebler Company in honor of its founding father. Oh, and about Ernie and the rest of the elves? They didn’t appear until 1970, when the Leo Burnett Company devised them as part of an advertising campaign.

19. MARIE CALLENDER’S PIES

In the early 1940s, Marie Callender began delivering her pies to area restaurants. By the end of the decade—with the help of her son and her husband—she was running a wholesale bakery and making more than 200 pies each day. In 1964, she opened her first pie and coffee shop. As Callender’s name grew in popularity, the opportunity to license it became a profitable part of the family business venture. In 1994, ConAgra Foods purchased a variety of product licenses and began putting out the frozen food line, which includes both sweet and savory pies and more.

20. ORVILLE REDENBACHER POPCORN

The Orville Redenbacher brand claims that the company founder “dedicated his life to perfecting a lighter, fluffier popcorn.” The Indiana farm boy was just 12 when he began growing and selling popping corn, the profits of which he used to fund his college education (a B.S. in Agriculture from Purdue University). After years of playing around with popcorn hybrids, Redenbacher and his business partner Charlie Bowman came up with their famous formula in 1965, which is light and fluffy and offers a 44:1 ratio of popped to un-popped corn.

21. SMUCKER'S JAM

Today, the J.M. Smucker Company is home to more than 30 product lines, including Jif peanut butter, Folgers coffee, and Pillsbury baked goods. But back in 1897, when it was founded by farmer Jerome M. Smucker, pressed cider was its main product. Apple butter (sold from the back of a horse-drawn wagon) came next and eventually blossomed into a full line of well-known jams, jellies, syrups, ice cream toppings, and more.

22. KRAFT CHEESE

Success was not immediate for Kraft Foods founder James L. Kraft. In 1903, the Canada-born businessman started a door-to-door cheese company in Chicago with just $65 to his name. Though the company lost $3,000 in its initial year, business started booming when James’ brothers joined him in the endeavor in 1909. Five years later, the company had more than 30 varieties of cheese among its offerings. Today, it’s one of the world’s largest food manufacturers, with nearly $19 billion in revenue last year alone.

23. MORTON SALT

Originally established as Richmond & Company, Agents for Onondaga Salt in 1848, the salt company that made an icon of a little girl in a yellow raincoat first took on the Morton name in 1889, when businessman Joy Morton acquired a major portion of the company and renamed it Joy Morton & Company. Twenty-one years—and several acquisitions—later, the company was renamed the Morton Salt Company.

24. MOTT’S APPLESAUCE

Pork chops have got Samuel R. Mott, a Quaker who decided to start his own cider and vinegar business in 1842, to thank for the applesauce that makes the dish. It wasn’t until the Great Depression, when it was known as Duffy-Mott, that the company began to truly diversify. In 1930, they introduced a wide range of new products, including the applesauce that would become a flagship item.

25. OSCAR MAYER HOT DOGS

German immigrant Oscar Mayer was just 14 years old when he began learning the meat market trade as an apprentice in Chicago. By 1900, Oscar and his brothers were some of the Windy City’s busiest sausage makers. In 1924, they were the first to bring pre-sliced packaged bacon to the market. Five years later, Oscar released his now-famous yellow paper band-wrapped hot dogs to the public.

26. UNCLE BEN’S RICE

Though not much is known about the real Uncle Ben, the company asserts that he is indeed a real person. He is, in fact, a combination of two people: the actual Uncle Ben, a farmer from Texas who set the standard of how rice should be grown, and Frank Brown, a chef and waiter from Chicago whose likeness is used on every Uncle Ben product.

27. NATHAN’S FAMOUS HOT DOGS

The Nathan behind these rightfully famous frankfurters is Nathan Handwerker, a Polish immigrant and restaurant worker who—at the urging of his co-workers Eddie Cantor and Jimmy Durante (both of whom worked as singing waiters)—opened a hot dog stand on the Coney Island Boardwalk in 1916. Cantor and Durante quickly became some of Nathan’s best customers (Al Capone and Cary Grant frequented the stand, too), but Nathan truly earned the “Famous” in his name in 1939, when FDR served Nathan’s hot dogs to the King and Queen of England.

28. BREYER’S ICE CREAM

Ice cream was in its infancy in 1866, which is when William A. Breyer began to make and sell it via horse and wagon in the Philadelphia area. In 1908, William’s son Henry incorporated the business, which became part of the Kraft family of foods in 1926, and then Unilever in 1993.

29. BUSH’S BAKED BEANS

If you believe what the commercials tell you, the only people to know the secret recipe for Bush’s variety of baked beans are select family members and a talking dog named Duke. What we do know is that the company was founded in 1904 by A.J. Bush, mainly as a tomato canning business. During the Great Depression, the company added canned pork and beans to its product line. It wasn’t until 1969 that the family’s secret recipe for baked beans came into the picture, when Condon Bush (A.J.’s grandson) decided to re-create his mom Kathleen’s recipes for mass consumption.

30. MRS. SMITH’S PIES

Pottstown, Pennsylvania housewife Amanda Smith’s transformation from homemaker to business owner began at the urging of her son Robert, who was so enamored of his mom’s cooking that he began selling slices of her fruit pies door to door. By 1925, the family business was doing so well that they needed to incorporate and Mrs. Smith's Delicious Home Made Pies, Inc. was born. Today, there are more than 20 varieties of Mrs. Smith’s products available in the frozen food aisle, from crusts to cobblers and two separate pie lines (Original Flaky Crust or Classic).

31. VAN DE KAMP’S FISH STICKS

Before their family name became synonymous with frozen seafood, the Van de Kamp clan—headed up by Theodore, with support from his sisters Marian and Henrietta—dabbled in snacks (the brand began as part of a potato chip stand in Los Angeles). They eventually expanded their offerings to include baked goods and, in the 1950s, ran a local restaurant chain that became known for its delicious plates of batter-fried halibut.

32. SARA LEE DESSERTS

Sara Lee Lubin may get most of the culinary credit, but she was merely the namesake of the dessert line that was named in her honor. In fact, she was only eight years old when her father, Charles, started the Sara Lee bakery chain in Chicago. In 1956, the company was purchased by Consolidated Foods, and Sara Lee became a baked goods icon.

33. ANNIE’S HOMEGROWN MACARONI & CHEESE

Though the Annie’s Homegrown line of foods now goes well beyond mac and cheese, that signature boxed food item was where this company started in 1989 when Annie Withey and Andrew Martin decided to show that healthy food could taste delicious, and that success and social responsibility could go hand in hand in the business world. In the early days, the phone number and address on Annie’s products connected the customer directly to Withey herself.


Qwiklit

advertisement Pickles vs. the Zombies – Pre-Order Now Words aren’t created in a vacuum, and when you trace their origin to the source, you often find that they come from [&hellip]

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Words aren’t created in a vacuum, and when you trace their origin to the source, you often find that they come from unexpected places. For this list, I’ve found 40 toponyms: words that are named after the place in which they were created or inspired by.

You may know some of them already, but most of these surprised me. Please add your favorites in the comments.

Named after the breeds of rabbits, cats and goats that frequented the region around Ankara, the present capital of Turkey.

Plato taught classes to his pupils (which included Aristotle) at Akademeia, which translates roughly to the “grove of Akademos”, an enclosed garden located near Athens. Akademos is named after the Trojan war hero of the same name.

The word ‘attic’ literally means “Athenian”, and was a decorative but addition placed upon the top of many ancient Greek buildings (The top part of the parthenon is an example of an Attic aesthetic).

Named after the seat of the Duke of Beaufort in Gloucestershire, the game was invented at Badminton House in rural England. Before the sport came to fruition, Badminton House also inspired the name of a mixed drink that includes claret, sugar and spritzer.

The Balaclava is named after The Battle of Balaklava, which occurred during the Crimean War in the 1850’s. Ironically, though, the garment was never worn there, and the name actually derives from the beards donned by many of the British veterans returning from the war.

The word often used to describe age and weight groupings in sport derives from a small town in Indonesia, Banten, which hosted a small-to-midsize chicken popular with traders at the time.

The word actually comes from the name of the English city, and not the other way around. Famous for it’s Roman-era hot springs, the town is still a big draw among tourists.

The bikini is named after the Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands, where Americans conducted atomic bomb testing in 1946. In 1947, French engineer Louis Reard named his two-piece swimsuit invention after the place.

During the 15th century an influx of gypsies arrived in Paris from Egypt, but many misattributed their home of origin to a small province in the Austrian Empire called Bohemia (now around the Czech Republic). The term was later used to describe the poor artist communities of the city.

It kind of sounds like an obvious one, but 13th century Belgian farmers deliberately developed the small vegetable long before it became a staple in both French and English cuisine.

Originally from Armenia, the town of Cantalupo in Sabina grew the first cantaloupes in Europe. A few miles north of Rome, Cantalupo contains a Papal villa.

The horrific color comes from the liqueur of the same name, which was first distilled by the monks of the Carthusian order near Grenoble, France.

The word ‘cherry’ was taken from the Norman cherise, which was taken from the latin cerasum, which literally means ‘of Cerasus’, an ancient Roman town now known as Giresun in modern-day Turkey.

Modern-day Clink Street Prison Museum

The slang tem for prison comes from the London prison, formerly located on Clink Street. It was destroyed during the Gordon riots of 1780, where TK

The title of goatskin leather is named after the Spanish city of Cordoba, which was once the heart of Muslim Europe, and even spawned the so-called “Golden Age of Poetry” during the 11th century.

The famous movie dog comes from the Croatian region of Dalmatia, but was largely bred for its spotted pattern in England.

Duffel, Belgium (dronestagr.am)

Duffel bags were actually produced in the small town of Duffel, Belgium, which is located near present-day Antwerp.

The type of expanding bullet were produced at a small military outpost in Dumdum, India, near Kolkata.

Epsom Salts are named after the Epsom Spring, a popular spa among Londoners in the seventeenth century. the spring contained high levels of magnesium sulphate.

popular in North America among the Shriners, Fez hats come from the Moroccan city of Fez, where muslim worshippers would not be able to kneel and pray with a brimmed hat, and therefore needed something practical to cover their head.

Geysers are a natural phenomenon caused by the shooting of hot water through a vent. Popular with tourists, the word ‘geyser’ comes from Geysir, the location of a hot spring in Iceland.

Gheto Vechio, Venice, Italy

Possibly derived from the Medieval-Venetian word for ‘founding’ (as in a foundry). A large foundry was located in the poor and walled Jewish district of Venice in the sixteenth century, which is of course featured in William Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice.

Aldus Manutius, inventor of italics.

the word ‘italic’ literally means “Of Italy”, and were invented by Italian printer Aldus Manutius in 1501. He wrote an edition of Virgil’s works using the font style in hopes of imitating genuine hand-writing.

Part of the United Kingdom, the Channel Island of Jersey made the majority of garments from the cattle they bred. In time, they become a fashionable sweater, and from then on, sports teams adopted them as uniforms.

Laconia is the province in red at the bottom of Greece

Laconic is word describing people who are tight-lipped and generally quiet in speech. The word comes from Laconia, the Ancient Greek district where Sparta was located. Legend has it that Alexander the Great threatened to invade Laconia and uttered:

“If I enter Laconica, I will level Sparta to the ground.”

Then, the Spartans replied with:

The type of poem famous for its brevity and bawdiness comes from the Irish city of the same name, but its origins are largely unrelated to the town itself. Rather, a famous chorus sung between limericks during performances contained the line “Will you come up to Limerick”.

Magenta was the location of a battle during the Franco-Austrian war (The Austrians Lost), and it turned out that an aniline dye could be developed from the coal-tar located near that battle. Magenta ended up being the first synthetic dye used in textiles.

Photo Courtesy of: foodbeast.com

Mayonnaise was supposedly created for the first time in Mahon, a small town in Minorca where the French were battling the Spanish. Apparently, the chef of the Duke of Richelieu created it to make the local food taste better.

It’s origins get even more interesting, though, if you consider that Mahon is named after Mago, a carthaginian admiral, making ‘mayonnaise’ the only word in the English language to have a Punic etymology.

The beige-colored enveloped used for sending documents and mid-sized packages is named after Manila hemp, which was taken from the tree of the same name grown around the Philippines.

Marathon, Greece (Courtesy of Wikipedia)

The popular type of race is named after the legendary spring of an Athenian sold, who supposedly jogged from Marathon to Athens to let to locals know that they had beaten the Persians, then subsequently dropped dead (Herodotus claims that he ran from Athens to Sparta to get reinforcements for the battle of Marathon). Nevertheless, the Greeks commemorated the event by holding an inaugural marathon race during the 1896 Olympics in Athens.

Classic Buyuk Menderes move (Photo Courtesy of http://www.zamanvadisi.com)

This fairly common word comes from a fairly unlikely source—the river Buyuk Menderes in Turkey. The river is known in the region for taking a very lengthy, sinuous route.

The word comes from the cotton fabric once produced in the city of Mosul, Iraq. The city recently made headlines when it was successfully invaded and occupied by ISIS.

Ottomans were actually a popular fixture among the royalty of the Ottoman empire, and became popular in the West when Victorian England and France grew obsessed with the Orientalist imagery of Eurasia and the Middle-East.

oporto, Portugal (Photo courtesy of Wikipedia)

The type of fortified wine was mostly exported out from Oporto, Portugal, which is today also known for a successful soccer team.

The popular sporting event is named after the Rugby School in England, a high school which has long been associated with Oxford. In the nineteenth century, two types of football were popular among schoolboys, Rugby football and Association football. At the time, it was popular slang to called the former rugger and the latter soccer.

The word often describing a mocking, funny look comes from the island of Sardinia, or more precisely its endemic grass herbs sardonia, which when eaten, causes us to grimace and chuckle. Side note: Sardines are also named after the island, as they were bountiful off its coasts.

Chang and Eng Bunker (Photo Courtesy of http://www.ourstate.com/)

Siamese twins are a popular if not archaic term for conjoined twins. The phrase comes from the Chang and Eng, conjoined twins from Siam who toured the world in circuses and so-called freak shows during the 19th century.

Spa, Belgium (Photo Courtesy of Wikipedia)

Spas are actually named after the town of Spa, in Belgium, a town famous in the 16th century for its mineral springs. The city is also famous for having a pump-room built by Peter the Great. Spa is also where Kaiser Wilhelm II officially abdicated the German throne in 1918, leading to the end of the First World War.

The name of a dance originating in Taranto, Italy called the tarantella—meant to cure a disease called Tarantism—inspired the naming of a local spider who was rumored to cause the disease.

Tuxedo Club, NY (Photo coutesy of http://www.thetuxedoclub.org/)

The tuxedo was actually commonly-known as the dinner jacket before a man called Griswold Lorillard started wearing them to a local haunt called the Tuxedo Club in Tuxedo, New York.


19 Tempeh

Tempeh never looks very appetizing - after all it looks like a mixture of beans with sticky white mush in between them. But there’s a reason this food is so popular in other parts of the world.

Originating from Indonesia, tempeh is a traditional soy product that is a staple source of protein in many cultures. It's similar to tofu in that it’s made from soybeans, though it has different nutritional values and texture. Specifically, since it’s a whole soybean product, it has a higher content of protein, fibre, and valuable vitamins. It has a firm texture and earthy flavor but can take on the flavor of what its cooked with, also similar to tofu.